“The Art of Gaman”

Jan. 30, 2015 through Sept. 20, 2015
Mincberg Gallery

In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans in the United States, including men, women, children, the elderly and the infirm, for the duration of World War II.


Reprinted from "The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946" (Ten Speed Press, c. 2005), by Delphine Hirasuna with design by Kit Hinrichs and photography by Terry Heffernan.


The evacuation affected the entire Japanese American population on the U.S. West Coast. Allowed only what they could carry, they were given just a few days to settle their affairs and report to assembly centers. Businesses were lost, personal property was stolen or vandalized and lives were shattered. Imprisoned in remote camps surrounded  by barbed wire and guarded by soldiers with machine guns, the internees sought solace in art.

Their artistic creations – a celebration of the nobility of the human spirit in adversity – are the focus of a new exhibit, “The Art of Gaman,” opening Jan. 30, 2015, and on view through Sept. 20, 2015, at Holocaust Museum Houston’s Morgan Family Center, 5401 Caroline St. in Houston’s Museum District.  HMH members are invited to a free preview reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. To renew a membership or to join and attend, visit www.hmh.org, e-mail membership@hmh.org or call 713-527-1640.

Following the preview, there will be a private reception with special guests for Art Circle members. Art Circle at Holocaust Museum Houston is a group created to connect HMH members and the Houston community with artists and collectors engaged in social, political and/or human rights issues. Funds raised by Art Circle membership supports the art exhibition program at the Museum. To join Art Circle and attend the reception following this event, please contact Marci Dallas at mdallas@hmh.org.

“The Art of Gaman” showcases more than 120 artifacts made by Japanese Americans while incarcerated in camps during World War II. It explores the creativity and ingenuity of these internees, as well as the Japanese concept of gaman, "to endure the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity."

Struggling to form communities within the camps, the internees fashioned furniture from scrap lumber, wove baskets from unravelled twine and made corsages from shells dug up from an ancient seabed.

Works on display range from tools, decorative objects, woodcarvings, paintings, furniture, toys and more and are presented with historical context through photographs, documents and films. Most of the objects on view are on loan from former internees or their families. A dark, yet important chapter in American history, “The Art of Gaman” is a moving display of perseverance, resourcefulness and the power of the human spirit.

“The Art of Gaman” is organized by curator Delphine Hirasuna, with advisory support Smithsonian American Art and the  Japanese American Citizens League.

“The Art of Gaman" is presented locally by:

Bank of Texas

Art Circle at Holocaust Museum Houston

Donna Cole

with special thanks to

Next Door Painting
Valspar Corporation
Houston Pecan Company
Three Brothers Bakery
 United Airlines KPRC
 
 


Press Release Related Exhibits
Wood carving of little birds was a prevalent art form in all of the camps. A set of Audubon bird identification cards a
Wood carving of little birds was a prevalent art form in all of the camps. A set of Audubon bird identification cards and an old National Geographic issue that featured birds were sources of research and inspiration for many carvers. Artists: Himeko Fukuhara, Kazuko Matsumoto, Sadao Oka, and unidentified artists interned at Amache, Colorado; Gila River, Arizona; and Poston, Arizona. Material: Scrap wood and paint. On loan courtesy of Jewel Nishi Okawachi; Jane Oka; Delphine. Reprinted from "The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946" (Ten Speed Press, c. 2005), by Delphine Hirasuna with design by Kit Hinrichs and photography by Terry Heffernan.
Cranes made by Jitsuro Hiramoto. Hiramoto, a farmer in Lodi, California, was fifty-five years old when he was arrested
Cranes made by Jitsuro Hiramoto. Hiramoto, a farmer in Lodi, California, was fifty-five years old when he was arrested Cranes made by Jitsuro Hiramoto. Hiramoto, a farmer in Lodi, California, was fifty-five years old when he was arrested by the FBI the day after Pearl Harbor and sent to the Santa Fe Detention Center. He was later transferred to Rohwer, Arkansas, to join his family. Other than telling his wife that the Santa Fe experience was “pretty bad,” he never spoke of his time there. During the war, his son served overseas in the U.S. Army. Materials: mesquite and scrap lumber. On loan courtesy of Ed Hiramoto. Courtesy, Delphine Hirasuna
Samurai made by Kinoe Adachi, who was interned in Topaz. Materials: shells, paint, wood, glue and a bottle cap.On loan
Samurai made by Kinoe Adachi, who was interned in Topaz. Materials: shells, paint, wood, glue and a bottle cap.On loan courtesy of Keith Nomura. Courtesy, Delphine Hirasuna
Painting of Tule Lake by Jimmy Mirikitani. Materials: paper, paint. On loan courtesy of Pauline Sakai. Courtesy, Delphi
Painting of Tule Lake by Jimmy Mirikitani. Materials: paper, paint. On loan courtesy of Pauline Sakai. Courtesy, Delphi Painting of Tule Lake by Jimmy Mirikitani. Materials: paper, paint. On loan courtesy of Pauline Sakai. Courtesy, Delphine Hirasuna
Toy train made by Edward Jitsue Kurushima, who was interned at Poston. Materials: scrap metal, scrap wood, paint. On lo
Toy train made by Edward Jitsue Kurushima, who was interned at Poston. Materials: scrap metal, scrap wood, paint. On loan courtesy of Jon Klusmire. Courtesy, Delphine Hirasuna
Address and Directions
 
Holocaust Museum Houston
Morgan Family Center
5401 Caroline St.
Houston, TX 77004-6804
Phone: 713-942-8000



Holocaust Museum Houston is a member of the Houston Museum District Association and is located in Houston's Museum District.

Holocaust Museum Houston is an accredited member of the American Alliance of Museums.

Hours and Admission
 
The Museum is open to the public seven days a week.

Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Noon to 5 p.m.


The Boniuk Library is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Library is closed Saturdays and Sundays.

The Museum is closed for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. For other holiday hours, visit the "Events" tab on the Museum’s Web site at www.hmh.org.

ADMISSION RATES:

Members FREE
Children under age 6 FREE
Students age 6-18 FREE
College-level with valid school ID FREE
Seniors age 65+ $8
AARP members with valid ID card $8
Active-Duty Military $8
General Admission $12

Holocaust Museum Houston is free each Thursday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and on Memorial Day (May 30, 2016), D-Day (June 6, 2016), Kristallnacht (Nov. 9, 2016) and International Holocaust Remembrance Day (Jan. 27, 2016).

Tours
 
Docent-led tours can be scheduled for schools and groups of 10 or more. Tours are available in Spanish, English and French. To arrange a docent-led tour, please call Visitor Services at 713-942-8000, ext. 302 or submit the form below.

Guided tours are available for all visitors on Saturday and Sunday. Saturday tours run at 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Sunday tours are scheduled for 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

E-mail Page Sitemap Legal Notice Our Sponsors
Holocaust Museum Houston Morgan Family Center, 5401 Caroline St., Houston, TX 77004-6804, Tel: 713-942-8000, E-mail: info@hmh.org Powered by Nodus Solutions
Rss Feeds RSS Feeds Plan Your Visit   About HMH    Exhibitions   Events   Membership   Education/Outreach   Resources   News/Media   Support HMH   HMH Store