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2016 Events

Citywide Yom HaShoah Commemoration

May 1, 2016 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location Congregation Brith Shalom, 4610 Bellaire Blvd., Bellaire, TX 77401
 
Join us for Houston’s annual Yom HaShoah commemorative service in memory of all who died in the Holocaust and to pay tribute to those who survived. The service is free and open to the public. 

 
 
 
“Weapons of War: Genocide in Darfur”
April 26, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
As part of Genocide Awareness Month, Holocaust Museum Houston's NEXTGen is partnering with Darfur Women Action Group to screen the short documentary "Violence Against Women," followed by a discussion with Hawa Mohammed, a survivor from the Darfur region of Sudan and recent Houston transplant, who will be sharing her story of survival and activism. Genocide was declared in Sudan in 2003, yet the people of Darfur continue to suffer at the hands of the Janjaweed and Sudanese government. In the last 13 years, more than 400,000 people have been killed, and another 2.5 million have been displaced, Women especially face enduring violence, with rape being used as a weapon of war. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org.RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
Book Discussion: “The Inextinguishable Symphony” by Martin Goldsmith
April 25, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
This April, Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris facilitates a discussion of “The Inextinguishable Symphony,” by Martin Goldsmith. A moving account of emotional strength under fire chronicles the true story of two Jewish musicians who fell in love under the Nazi regime and managed to keep their passion and their music alive through very difficult times. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. Registration is limited to 12 participants, but the discussion may be offered on a second date. If registration is full, contact Maria Harris at 713-527-1610 or library@hmh.org to add your name to an interest list. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/Registerevent.aspx.


 Buy Books
 
 
 
“The Devil in the Details”: Gender, Genocide and the Family
April 15, 2016 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
As part of Genocide Awareness Month, this workshop will examine genocide in the world today. This workshop will examine the gendered aspects of genocide, from the targeting of the family unit to the destruction of culture. While working with internationally known scholars, educators will focus on how to affect real change from the classroom. Using primary source materials and film segments, participants will be prepared to make pedagogical choices as they implement studies related to genocide. Educators will dissect the controversial definition of genocide and look critically at current genocides and human rights abuses, as well as how to appropriately teach them in the classroom. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies (particularly world history) and English/Language Arts for teachers in grades 3-12. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by April 12, 2016.  To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/Registerevent.aspx.
 
 
 
“Life Force Atrocities and the Assault on the Family in Times of Conflict”
April 14, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Elisa von Joeden-Forgey will discuss the attempt to destroy families in genocidal conflicts, in particular gendered violence. She will use examples from genocides such as the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, Bosnia and Rwanda as well as conflicts in Sierra Leone and Democratic Republic of Congo. Elisa von Joeden-Forgey is an assistant professor of Holocaust and genocide studies at Stockton University. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
L’Dor Vador: Poetry and Dance from Three Generations of a Jewish Family”
April 9, 2016 8:00 PM - 9:30 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center, 5601 S. Braeswood, Houston, TX 77096
 
L’Dor Vador” will pay tribute to nationally recognized Jewish writers Hans and Ilse Juergensen - Holocaust refugees from Germany who have published 15 volumes of poetry between them. Their only child, Claudia Juergensen Noble, who now resides in the Houston area, became a poet and playwright with eight theatrical productions. Their grandson, Andy Noble, co-directs NobleMotion Dance, which was recently titled “Houston’s Best Dance Company.” This project highlights three generations of artists and tells the story of a family’s journey from battled Europe to the J’s Kaplan Theatre. The original evening of work performed by NobleMotion Dance will pay tribute to the traditions, memories, nightmares, struggles and fables that are shared so eloquently through the Juergensen’s poetry. It is Andy and Claudia’s hope that people of all ages and cultures can relate to the subject matter that enlivens the past and present through text and movement. A pre-show talk with be conducted prior to each performance. A second performance is scheduled for 3 p.m., on Sunday, April 10. For information and to purchase tickets, visit www.erjcchouston.org/ldorvador or call 713-551-7215.
 
 
 
Members' Coffee and Tour
April 9, 2016 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Connect with the HMH collection and fellow members with an introduction over coffee in the classroom and an in-depth gallery tour focusing on a special topic. Members may invite one non-member guest. The Museum is planning monthly members-only tours. Give us your feedback so that the Museum can plan the best tours for you. Leave your comments at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MemberTour. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.



 
 
 
"Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning," with Dr. Timothy Snyder
April 5, 2016 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Dr. Timothy Snyder will discuss his new book, presenting a new explanation of the great atrocity of the 20th century and revealing the risks that we face in the 21st.  Based on new sources from Eastern Europe and forgotten testimonies from Jewish survivors, Snyder will recount the mass murder of the Jews as an event that is still close to us, more comprehensible than we would like to think, and thus all the more terrifying. Drawing parallels between the early 21st century and the early 20th, he will show how our world is closer to Adolf Hitler's than we like to admit and saving it requires us to see the Holocaust as it was - and ourselves as we are. Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford in 1997. Before joining the faculty at Yale in 2001, he held fellowships in Paris, Vienna and Warsaw and an Academy Scholarship at Harvard. Among his publications are several award-winning books, all of which have been translated. Snyder sits on the editorial boards of the Journal of Modern European History and East European Politics and Societies. His scholarly articles have appeared in many journals and newspapers. Snyder was the recipient of an inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellowship in 2015. He is a member of the Committee on Conscience of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and sits on the advisory councils of the Yivo Institute for Jewish Research and other organizations. His talk will be preceded by a reception at 5:30 p.m. and followed with a book signing at 8:00 p.m. Admission is free, but seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online. This event is cosponsored by the Lone Star Book Festival at Lone Star College and the Houston Public Library.



 
 
 
Preview Reception: “H·O·P·E: Paintings by Samuel Bak”
March 31, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 
Holocaust artist Samuel Bak creates an astoundingly complex, beautiful and richly colorful journey for viewers in his newest exhibit at Holocaust Museum Houston. In “H·O·P·E: Paintings by Samuel Bak,” the letters from the word H·O·P·E. appear in various phases, some partially hidden, others fragmented, some large, others small. The paintings in the H·O·P·E series do not attempt to illustrate the atrocities of the Holocaust, yet they show viewers the destruction, ruin and sadness left in its wake. “The call to create art – and indeed to respond creatively to its power – allows us to find hope even in shattering despair,” Bak has said. The exhibition includes a selection of 33 works by the Massachusetts-based artist, recognized internationally as one of the most important artists of his time. HMH members are invited to a preview reception with the artist from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 31, 2016. Admission is free, but advance registration is required for this reception. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.


 Press Release
 
 
 
“Wiesenthal,” written by and starring Tom Dugan, cosponsored by the Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center
March 29, 2016 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center, 5601 S. Braeswood Blvd., Houston, TX 77096
 
Filled with hope, humanity and humor, the one-man play “Wiesenthal” is the inspiring true story of Simon Wiesenthal (1908-2005), played by Tom Dugan. Sometimes referred to as "the Jewish James Bond," Wiesenthal escaped death at the hands of Hitler's SS, lost 89 family members and devoted more than six decades to bringing Nazi war criminals to justice. Part memoir and part spy thriller, Dugan's play introduces audiences to Wiesenthal on the day before his retirement as he welcomes his final group of Americans to his office in The Jewish Documentation Center in Vienna. General admission is $35, $28 for seniors age 60+, $20 for teachers with school identification and $15 for students with ID. Matinees are at 1 p.m. March 31, April 1 and 3 p.m. on April 3. Evening performances are March 29 through March 31 at 7:30 p.m.,  and April 2 at 8 p.m. For tickets, visit http://www.erjcchouston.org.

 
 
 
Book Discussion: “The Sunflower” by Simon Wiesenthal
March 22, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
This March, Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris will facilitate a discussion of “The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness” by Simon Wiesenthal. In his book, a group of philosophers, critics and writers weigh the moral issues involved in a young Jew's response to a dying Nazi's confession of mass murder. Admission is free, but advance  registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. Registration is limited to 12 participants, but the discussion may be offered on a second date. If registration is full, call 713-527-1610 or email library@hmh.org to add your name to an interest list.

 Buy Books
 
 
 
Living Library Interest Meeting
March 19, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
What's your story? Holocaust Museum Houston's Friends of The Boniuk Library are seeking diverse participants for a Living Library. These participants will act as Human Books, which are available for check-out for 15-minute conversations during a Living Library event in May. Do you have a story to share? Come to our interest meeting to find out how you can teach others, share your story and celebrate diversity with The Boniuk Library. This meeting is free and open to the public, but space is limited, and advance registration is recommended.To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. For more information, call 713-527-1610 or email library@hmh.org.

 
 
 
“A Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did” - 5 p.m. Screening
March 8, 2016 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
In the Houston premiere of this documentary, human rights lawyer Philippe Sands conducts conversations with two men whose fathers were indicted as Nazi war criminals.  The two sons have starkly contrasting attitudes towards their fathers; one can’t bring himself to condemn his father while the other despises his father. The three men travel together across Europe on a challenging journey. For Sands, it means visiting the place where much of his own Jewish family was destroyed. It is an emotional, psychological exploration of three men wrestling with their past and conflicting versions of the truth. This film is presented as part of the Houston Jewish Film Festival, March 5 through March 20. Admission is $8 for HMH members and seniors and $10 for the general public. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. For more information on the Houston Jewish Film Festival, visit www.erjcchouston.org/filmfest.

 
 
 
“A Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did” - 7:30 p.m. Screening
March 8, 2016 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
In the Houston premiere of this documentary, human rights lawyer Philippe Sands conducts conversations with two men whose fathers were indicted as Nazi war criminals.  The two sons have starkly contrasting attitudes towards their fathers; one can’t bring himself to condemn his father while the other despises his father. The three men travel together across Europe on a challenging journey. For Sands, it means visiting the place where much of his own Jewish family was destroyed. It is an emotional, psychological exploration of three men wrestling with their past and conflicting versions of the truth. This film is presented as part of the Houston Jewish Film Festival, March 5 through March 20. Admission is $8 for HMH members and seniors and $10 for the general public. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. For more information on the Houston Jewish Film Festival, visit www.erjcchouston.org/filmfest.








 
 
 
“Be An Upstander!" Girl Scout Council of San Jacinto Cadette Workshop
March 6, 2016 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Get empowered to be a positive force for change. For centuries, people have struggled with peer pressure, bullying, friendship and fitting into their social world. In this workshop, girls will complete portions of the aMAZE Journey by exploring historical leadership, prejudices and experiences in comparison with their modern-day lives. Cadettes will learn about social injustices in the world today. In addition to Journey work, girls will learn how to be an advocate for positivity in their community through the Science of Happiness badge. This activity is girls-only. Girls may be dropped off for the program. Adults may stay at the Museum if they desire, but will not participate in activities with
the girls. The cost of this program is $20, which includes a Museum tour, program supplies and lunch. For more information, call 713-292-0271 or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Registration closes Feb. 28, 2016. To register, visit https://gsusa.ebiz.uapps.net/vp/FamilyManagement/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductId=1985270230.

 
 
 
“It's Your World - Change It!" Girl Scout Council of San Jacinto Older Girl Workshop
March 5, 2016 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Build a vision for a better world while learning how to stand up and speak out as a social innovator. Girls will complete portions of the GIRLtopia or Bliss Journeys by exploring historical leadership, prejudices and experiences with Holocaust Museum Houston. Seniors and Ambassadors will learn about persecuted populations undergoing social cruelty. In addition to Journey work, girls will learn how to be an advocate for change through the Social Innovator or Public Policy badge. This activity is girls-only. Girls may be dropped off for the program. Adults may stay at the Museum if they desire, but will not participate in activities with the girls. The cost of this program is $20, which includes a Museum tour, program supplies and lunch. For more information, call GSSJC at 713-292-0271 or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Registration ends on Feb. 27, 2016. To register, visit https://gsusa.ebiz.uapps.net/vp/FamilyManagement/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductId=1985268181.

 
 
 
"Memorials, Memorialization and Memory"
March 4, 2016 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
This workshop will introduce Holocaust and genocide memorials worldwide, as well as the politics of creating and sustaining these spaces. Teachers will leave this workshop will classroom ready resources on worldwide cultural history, politics, and memory, appropriate for all age levels. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies and English/Language Arts teachers in grades 3-12.  Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies may also wish to consider attending.  This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by March 1, 2016.  

 
 
 
Book Discussion: “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress” by Dai Sijie
February 23, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
This February, Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris facilitates a discussion of “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress” by Dai Sijie. At the height of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, two young boys are sent to the country for "reeducation" at a remote mountain village, where their lives take an unexpected turn when they meet the beautiful daughter of a local tailor and stumble upon a forbidden stash of Western classics in Chinese translations. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. Registration is limited to 12 participants, but the discussion may be offered on a second date. If registration is full, contact library@hmh.org to add your name to an interest list.
 Buy Books
 
 
 
"Through Different Lenses: Cultural and Historical Literacy through Photography"
February 19, 2016 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
In conjunction with HMH’s exhibition of Roman Vishniac’s iconic images of Jewish life in Europe before and during the Holocaust, this workshop will juxtapose images from American Indian, African American and Latino communities to examine photography not only as art, but also as witness. Participants will consider the pedagogical best practices in teaching about the Holocaust and other histories through photography. Participants will engage in a rich examination of cultural context and intended audiences, and will be actively involved in using strategies to incorporate new resources into their classrooms. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies teachers in grades 3-12.  Art educators are encouraged to attend. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for 6 hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Feb. 16, 2016. Photo: Boy suffering from a toothache clutches a tattered school notebook, Slonim, ca. 1935-38. Gift of Maria Vishniac Kohn. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.
 
 
 
"Every Face Has a Name"
February 18, 2016 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
For the film "Every Face Has a Name," director Magnus Gertten tracked down and interviewed survivors from German concentration camps seen in a 35-mm archival film reel showing their arrival at the harbor of Malmo, Sweden on April 28, 1945. The group includes Jews from all over Europe, Norwegian prisoners of war, Polish mothers and children, members of the French resistance and British spies, aswell as a young Italian-American accused of being a spy – with personal reactions that are both powerful and moving. Admission is free, but seating is limited and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. This event is cosponsored by the Consulate General of Sweden and the Consulate General of Denmark.


 
 
 
Opening Reception: “Taking Flight: The Butterfly Project”
February 11, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Central Gallery
 
For 20 years, Holocaust Museum Houston fostered a powerful project, “The Butterfly Project,” collecting 1.5 million handmade butterflies to commemorate the children who perished in the Holocaust. The project was imagined and based on an inspiring poem written by Pavel Friedmann in 1942, when he was a prisoner in the Terezin Concentration Camp in former Czechoslovakia. More than 12,000 children under the age of 15 passed through the Terezin camp between the years 1942-1944. More than 90 percent of the children who were there perished during the Holocaust. Between 1995 and 2015, more than 1.5 million handcrafted butterflies were brought to the Museum by students and children. These exquisite, colorful butterflies were created by people around the world using an incredible array of materials and innovation. The memory of the children who died in the Holocaust and the loss of their talents and possibilities is felt in the grace and beauty seen in each of the more than 100 handmade butterflies now on display, HMH members are invited to a free preview reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.


 
 
 
Friends of the Library Breakfast Book Discussion: “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress” by Dai Sijie
February 4, 2016 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Location Harry’s Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam at Bagby
 
This February, Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris facilitates a discussion of “Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress” by Dai Sijie. At the height of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, two young boys are sent to the country for "reeducation" at a remote mountain village, where their lives take an unexpected turn when they meet the beautiful daughter of a local tailor and stumble upon a forbidden stash of Western classics in Chinese translations. Participants must pay for breakfast. Registration is limited to six participants. All participants must be Friends of The Boniuk Library.
 Buy Books
 
 
 
Love and Hope: Poetry, Art and Expression During Genocide
January 29, 2016 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
This workshop will focus on written, musical and visual expressions of art as a teaching and healing tool, as well as understanding different forms of genocide and post-genocide expressions within their cultural context. Using primary source materials and film segments, participants will examine expressions of not only fear and trauma during genocide, but love, hope and reconciliation. Educators will be prepared to teach about the human elements beyond historical facts and figures. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies and English/Language Arts teachers in grades 3-12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies may also wish to consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Jan. 24, 2016. 
 
 
 
Opening of the Destroyed Communities Interactive Learning Center
January 27, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Location The Boniuk Library
 
The Destroyed Communities Interactive Learning Center will highlight information on more than 80 communities featured on the HMH memorial slope. Using a touchscreen display in The Boniuk Library, visitors will be able to learn about the history of each community, view photos of life before the Holocaust and read Survivor stories. The initial opening on Jan. 27, 2016 (International Holocaust Remembrance Day) will include the histories of a 27 villages, towns and cities from areas across Europe.

Visitors will continue to be able to explore the database as additional communities are added throughout the upcoming year. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested.

 
 
 
“Industrialized Killing: Seeking Justice and Accountability in Syria”
January 10, 2016 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
This lecture will discuss the various justice mechanisms available to the international community to hold all the warring factions in Syria accountable for war crimes. Professor David Crane is one of the key figures in modern international criminal law who is leading the international effort to develop a trial package for a future local, regional or international prosecutor to seek that justice for the people of Syria. Much of this effort is done by Syracuse University law students through the Syrian Accountability Project, which Crane founded. Crane also was the co-author of the Caesar Report, which found direct evidence of an industrialized killing machine in Syria created by President Bashar al-Assad. During his lecture, Crane will use this report to highlight the crimes against the Syrian people. Admission is free, but advance reservations are requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.


 Press Release
 
 
 
Docent-Led Tours
January 4, 2016 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston will offer guided tours of its permanent exhibit “Bearing Witness: A Community Remembers” as well as the 1942 German railcar and the Holocaust-era Danish rescue boat at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. during the holidays. Admission is free for HMH members and students, $12 for nonmembers and $8 for seniors and AARP members with valid ID.
 
 
 
2015 Events

Docent-Led Tours
December 28, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston will offer guided tours of its permanent exhibit “Bearing Witness: A Community Remembers” as well as the 1942 German railcar and the Holocaust-era Danish rescue boat at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Dec. 21-23 and 28-30 as well as Jan. 4, 2016. Admission is free for HMH members and students, $12 for nonmembers and $8 for seniors and AARP members with valid ID.
 
 
 
Holiday Weekend
December 25, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, Dec 24, 2015. The Museum will be closed Friday, Dec. 25, 2015, in observance of Christmas Day. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 26, 2015.

 
 
 
Docent-Led Tours
December 21, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston will offer guided tours of its permanent exhibit “Bearing Witness: A Community Remembers” as well as the 1942 German railcar and the Holocaust-era Danish rescue boat at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Dec. 21-23 and 28-30 as well as Jan. 4, 2016. Admission is free for HMH members and students, $12 for nonmembers and $8 for seniors and AARP members with valid ID.
 
 
 
“Kisses and Rainbows StoryTime and Craft Day”
December 5, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location The Boniuk Library
 
Join us for a special story time designed for the whole family. Grandparents, grandchildren, parents and children all are invited to participate in a fun story time and craft day hosted by Friends of the Library. “Kisses and Rainbows,” begins at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5. Come listen at 2:00 p.m. to “The Kissing Hand” by Auderey Penn and again at 3:00 p.m. to “The Rainbow Fish” by Marcus Pfister. Children can play at a craft station sponsored by Pop Shop Houston, enjoy snacks and buy unique children’s books. The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited, and advance registration is recommended. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx

 
 
 
"On Our Watch: ISIS and the Yazidi of Northern Iraq”

December 2, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Since the rise of the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) in August 2014, the Yazidi community has been in the midst of a human rights crisis. Members of the Houston Yazidi community will join Holocaust Museum Houston staff to provide a brief history of the Yazidi religion and culture and a panel discussion about the current perilous situation of the community. ISIS is said to have killed more than 6,000 Yazidi men, women, and children and kidnapped an additional 6,000 members of the community, mostly women and female children. The Yazidi population of Northern Iraq is now displaced to refugee camps, and they are suffering from lack of food, water, bad weather, mental and physical health conditions, as well as a lack of education facilities. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx
 
 
 
Thanksgiving Weekend
November 26, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be closed Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015, in observance of Thanksgiving Day. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 27, 2015.

 
 
 
“Seventy Years After the Holocaust – Why the Hunt and Prosecution of Nazi War Criminals Still Matters,” with Dr. Efraim Zuroff
November 23, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Dr. Efraim Zuroff was the first director of the Simon Wisenthal Center and began his career as a Nazi hunter in 1980 when hired by the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations. In 2002, Zuroff launched “Operation: Last Change,” which offers financial rewards for information that will facilitate the conviction and punishment of Nazi war criminals. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
Lecture Only: "Remembering the March on Selma and the Voting Rights Act 50 years Later,” with Susannah Heschel

November 18, 2015 7:30 PM - 8:45 PM
Location Westbury Christian School, 10420 Hillcroft St, Houston, TX 77096
 
Why Remember? Why is it important for our kids and grandchildren to know about these two historical events? What can we learn from these events to guide us through the challenges of today? The Civil Rights Movement aroused hopes that the racism permeating American society would one day be overcome. As an effort led by religious leaders of many denominations, the movement was inspirational and inspired great idealism as well as concrete legislative changes. However, recent laws, discourses and acts of violence have placed racism at the center of the American conversation. Why is racism so tenacious? Racial theory, the child of 19th century racism, has been thoroughly debunked, yet its conclusions seem to persist. How much do economics, the growing multi-culturalism of our society and the growing dialogue gap between the religious and secular communities come into play? What are the forces that give strength to racism, and what can we do to undermine those forces? Professor Susannah Heschel, the Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies at Dartmouth College and the daughter of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel,  who marched with Dr. Martin Luther King  at Selma, will discuss the historical significance of the March on Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Heschel's talk is presented as this year's Ruth Vinn Hendler Lack Lecture, in memory of the former executive director of the Museum. Admission to the lecture is free, but advance reservations are requested. To RSVP online visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. A prior Box Dinner and Discussion is $18 per person, and registration will also entitle you to attend the lecture without additional charge. Dinner reservations must be made by Nov. 13. Please see the Dinner and Discussion event entry above to RSVP for that event.


 
 
 
Dinner and Discussion: "Remembering the March on Selma and the Voting Rights Act 50 years Later,” with Susannah Heschel

November 18, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:45 PM
Location Westbury Christian School, 10420 Hillcroft St, Houston, TX 77096
 
Why Remember? Why is it important for our kids and grandchildren to know about these two historical events? What can we learn from these events to guide us through the challenges of today?  The Civil Rights Movement aroused hopes that the racism permeating American society would one day be overcome. As an effort led by religious leaders of many denominations, the movement was inspirational and inspired great idealism as well as concrete legislative changes. However, recent laws, discourses and acts of violence have placed racism at the center of the American conversation. Why is racism so tenacious? Racial theory, the child of 19th century racism, has been thoroughly debunked, yet its conclusions seem to persist. How much do economics, the growing multi-culturalism of our society and the growing dialogue gap between the religious and secular communities come into play? What are the forces that give strength to racism, and what can we do to undermine those forces? Professor Susannah Heschel, the Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies at Dartmouth College and the daughter of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel,  who marched with Dr. Martin Luther King  at Selma, will discuss the historical significance of the March on Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Heschel's talk is presented as this year's Ruth Vinn Hendler Lack Lecture, in memory of the former executive director of the Museum. Admission to the lecture is free, but advance reservations are requested. To RSVP online visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. The Box Dinner and Discussion is $18 per person, and registration will also entitle you to attend the lecture without additional charge. Dinner reservations must be made by Nov. 13.


 
 
 
“My Italian Secret: The Forgotten Heroes” 
November 11, 2015 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center, 5601 S. Braeswood Blvd., Houston, TX 77096
 
“My Italian Secret” compiles the little-known stories of Jews who lived or sought refuge in Italy during World War II and the Italians who helped them after German troops occupied the northern half of the country in 1943. Through these witnesses’ stories, viewers revisit a time when an entire continent was engulfed in genocide. The film personifies the actions of individual Italians, from everyday citizens to clergy and government officials and famous people such as Gino Bartali. These people rescued thousands of Jews from deportation and death, hiding and protecting them despite risks to their own lives and families. This event is part of the Ann and Stephen Kaufman Jewish Book and Arts Fair Nov. 1-15 , 2015. For more information, visit http://www.erjcchouston.org/arts/jewish-book-arts-fair/.

 
 
 
“Raise the Roof”
November 8, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center, 5601 S. Braeswood Blvd.,Houston, TX 77096
 
“Raise the Roof” is a film documentary about the rebuilding of an 18th-century Polish wooden synagogue. In 1731, a wooden synagogue was built in a small town called Gwozdziec. It was built with a magnificent, tent-like dome, illuminated by brightly colored paintings of animals. Soon other Jewish communities were inspired to build and paint even more imaginative synagogues, and eventually there were more than 200 of these architectural wonders dotted around the countryside. Two hundred years later, the Nazis burned every one of these synagogues to the ground. Rick and Laura Brown began this 10-year project to reconstruct the Gwozdziec synagogue with the help of expert craftsmen, students and other volunteers. They recreated the synagogue using old tools and artisanal techniques and, finally in 2014, the synagogue was installed as a major exhibit in the newly built Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw. This event is part of the Ann and Stephen Kaufman Jewish Book and Arts Fair Nov. 1-15 , 2015. For more information, visit http://www.erjcchouston.org/arts/jewish-book-arts-fair/.

 
 
 
“The Archive Thief,” with Lisa Leff
November 8, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center, 5601 S. Braeswood Blvd., Houston, TX 77096
 
In the aftermath of the Holocaust, Jewish historian Zosa Szajkowski gathered tens of thousands of documents from Nazi buildings in Berlin, public archives and private synagogues in France and moved them, illicitly, to New York. Author Lisa Leff will provide a perceptive portrait of this unusual villain and hero. Lisa Leff is associate professor of history at American University in Washington, DC. This event is part of the Ann and Stephen Kaufman Jewish Book and Arts Fair
Nov. 1-15, 2015. For more information, visit http://www.erjcchouston.org/arts/jewish-book-arts-fair/.



 
 
 
"Through Different Lenses: Cultural and Historical Literacy through Photography"
November 6, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
In conjunction with HMH’s exhibition of Roman Vishniac’s iconic images of Jewish life in Europe before and during the Holocaust, this workshop will juxtapose images from American Indian, African American and Latino communities to examine photography not only as art, but also as witness. Participants will consider the pedagogical best practices in teaching about the Holocaust and other histories through photography. Participants will engage in a rich examination of cultural context and intended audiences, and will be actively involved in using strategies to incorporate new resources into their classrooms. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies teachers in grades 3-12.  Art educators are encouraged to attend. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for 6 hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Nov. 2, 2015. Photo: Boy suffering from a toothache clutches a tattered school notebook, Slonim, ca. 1935-38. Gift of Maria Vishniac Kohn. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

 
 
 
Artful Thursday “Looking Up and Looking Down: The Spiritual Worlds of Mark Rothko and Roman Vishniac,” with Dr. Robert Abzug
November 5, 2015 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM
Location Brown Auditorium, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Caroline Wiess Law Building, 1001 Bissonnet, Houston, TX 77005
 
Dr. Robert Abzug will discuss the modern period reflecting Jewish identity in art, especially the works of photographer Roman Vishniac, artist Mark Rothko and other artists. Abzug holds the Audre and Bernard Rapoport Regents Chair of Jewish Studies at The University of Texas-Austin and is director of the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies. This event is cosponsored by Holocaust Museum Houston and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. To register, visit www.mfah.org.

 
 
 
Guardian of the Human Spirit Luncheon
November 2, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM
Location Hilton Americas-Houston, 1600 Lamar St., Houston, TX 77010
 
Join us for this annual luncheon honoring dedicated Houstonians who have worked to enhance the lives of others. Honorees this year are longtime Houston philanthropists Velva G. and H. Fred Levine. Keynote speaker for this year's event is author and New York Times columnist David Brooks. For tickets or table information, call 713-942-8000, ext. 112 or e-mail spiritlunch@hmh.org.

 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours
October 31, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 

Holocaust Museum Houston will offer tours focusing on the life and ministry of the German Lutheran theologian Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer four Saturdays in October. Tours will be offered Oct. 10, 17, 24, and 31 from 10:30 a.m. to noon.  Bonhoeffer's actions against the Nazi Party and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust will be the focus of tours of the Museum's permanent exhibit, German railcar and Danish fishing boat. Tours include a look at the early influences on Bonhoeffer before the Holocaust, his organization of the Confessing Church to stand with the Jews in reaction to the Aryan clause, his involvement in assassination attempts on Adolf Hitler and his imprisonment and execution at the Flossenburg concentration camp by direct order from Hitler. The tours include the stories of the Bishop of Munster and Pastor Trocme, church leaders who strived to protect victims from Nazi tyranny. Admission and the walk-in tour are $8.  To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.


 
 
 
"FDR and the Jews," with Richard Breitman
October 28, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Nearly 75 years after World War II, a contentious debate lingers over whether Franklin Delano Roosevelt turned his back on the Jews of Adolf Hitler's Europe. In this public lecture, Richard Breitman will discuss many new primary sources offering an intriguing portrait of a consummate politician - compassionate but also pragmatic - struggling with opposing priorities under perilous conditions. For most of his presidency, Roosevelt indeed did little to aid the imperiled Jews of Europe. He put domestic policy priorities ahead of helping Jews and deferred to others' fears of an antisemitic backlash. Yet, he also acted decisively at times to rescue Jews, often withstanding contrary pressures from his advisers and the American public. Even Jewish citizens who petitioned the president could not agree on how best to aid their co-religionists abroad. Though his actions may seem inadequate in retrospect, Breitman will bring to light a concerned leader whose efforts on behalf of Jews were far greater than those of any other world figure. Breitman is a distinguished professor emeritus at American University and the co-author with Allan J. Lichtman of "FDR and the Jews." Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.


 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours
October 24, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 

Holocaust Museum Houston will offer tours focusing on the life and ministry of the German Lutheran theologian Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer four Saturdays in October. Tours will be offered Oct. 10, 17, 24, and 31 from 10:30 a.m. to noon.  Bonhoeffer's actions against the Nazi Party and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust will be the focus of tours of the Museum's permanent exhibit, German railcar and Danish fishing boat. Tours include a look at the early influences on Bonhoeffer before the Holocaust, his organization of the Confessing Church to stand with the Jews in reaction to the Aryan clause, his involvement in assassination attempts on Adolf Hitler and his imprisonment and execution at the Flossenburg concentration camp by direct order from Hitler. The tours include the stories of the Bishop of Munster and Pastor Trocme, church leaders who strived to protect victims from Nazi tyranny. Admission and the walk-in tour are $8.  To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.


 
 
 
“Kisses and Rainbows StoryTime and Craft Day” -- CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER
October 24, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location The Boniuk Library
 
THIS EVENT has been CANCELLED and will be rescheduled at a later date due to the approaching storm.

Join us for a special story time designed for the whole family. Grandparents, grandchildren, parents and children all are invited to participate in a fun story time and craft day hosted by Friends of the Library. “Kisses and Rainbows,” begins at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 24. Come listen at 2:00 p.m. to “The Kissing Hand” by Auderey Penn and again at 3:00 p.m. to “The Rainbow Fish” by Marcus Pfister. Children can play at a craft station sponsored by Pop Shop Houston, enjoy snacks and buy unique children’s books. The event is free and open to the public, but space is limited, and advance registration is recommended. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx

 
 
 
“From Broadway to the Bima”
October 18, 2015 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 5501 Main St., Houston, TX 77004
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for The Guild’s annual concert fundraiser, featuring Cantor Mark Perman. Perman came to Houston from Simsbury, CT, a year ago and currently serves Congregation Emanu El as their cantor. Perman is a native New Yorker and received his bachelor's degree from New York University and later his ordination as cantor from Hebrew Union College - JIR in 1997. He began his career on Broadway in the 1970s in shows such as "Dude" and "Shenandoah," and he has also performed extensively in voice-overs and on camera commercials over the years as well. Other favorite roles include Emile Debecque in South Pacific and Father in "Children of Eden." Perman was inspired to become a cantor in part by his involvement with Congregation B'nai Jeshurun in New York City and later found a way to integrate his love of theater and his cantorial calling by creating "From Broadway to the Bima," referencing the area within the sanctuary where the cantor sings and leads the prayers during services. Perman's performances are designed to illustrate how both the cantorial and theatrical worlds intersect. He pays tribute to some of the legendary composers and lyricists who created these time honored classics. Tickets are $20 for general admission and $10 for children under 12. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
“Be An Upstander!" Girl Scout Council of San Jacinto Cadette Workshop
October 17, 2015 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Get empowered to be a positive force for change. For centuries, people have struggled with peer pressure, bullying, friendship and fitting into their social world. In this workshop, girls will complete portions of the aMAZE Journey by exploring historical leadership, prejudices and experiences in comparison with their modern-day lives. Cadettes will learn about social injustices in the world today. In addition to Journey work, girls will learn how to be an advocate for positivity in their community through the Science of Happiness badge. This activity is girls-only. Girls may be dropped off for the program. Adults may stay at the Museum if they desire, but will not participate in activities with
the girls. The cost of this program is $20, which includes a Museum tour, program supplies and lunch. For more information, call 713-292-0271or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Registration closes Oct. 04, 2015. To register, visit https://gsusa.ebiz.uapps.net/vp/FamilyManagement/ProductDetail.aspx?pid=115&ProductId=1689635652.

 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours
October 17, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 

Holocaust Museum Houston will offer tours focusing on the life and ministry of the German Lutheran theologian Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer four Saturdays in October. Tours will be offered Oct. 10, 17, 24, and 31 from 10:30 a.m. to noon.  Bonhoeffer's actions against the Nazi Party and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust will be the focus of tours of the Museum's permanent exhibit, German railcar and Danish fishing boat. Tours include a look at the early influences on Bonhoeffer before the Holocaust, his organization of the Confessing Church to stand with the Jews in reaction to the Aryan clause, his involvement in assassination attempts on Adolf Hitler and his imprisonment and execution at the Flossenburg concentration camp by direct order from Hitler. The tours include the stories of the Bishop of Munster and Pastor Trocme, church leaders who strived to protect victims from Nazi tyranny. Admission and the walk-in tour are $8.  To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.


 
 
 

"Implementing 'All Behaviors Count' in School Settings"

October 16, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Join the Education staff for a one-day workshop to learn how to utilize Holocaust Museum Houston’s “All Behaviors Count” program in your classroom as a part of National Bullying Awareness Month. This program examines the role each of the 5 forms of social cruelty plays in both school life and in our culture. In addition to teaching about these negative behaviors, this program also focuses on teaching about how to respond to social cruelty in positive ways.  These social resiliency skills – both intra-and inter-personal – mean that students who participate in the program are prepared to address issues of social cruelty directly.  
This program is highly recommended for districts working to meet state guidelines regarding stopping bullying in all grade levels (K-12). Teachers, principals, curriculum leaders and guidance counselors should consider attending.  This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for 6 hours in Social and Emotional Needs of G/T Learners.  The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch.  Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by October 13, 2015.  

 
 
 
Opening Reception: “Sojourn in the Shadowlands”
October 14, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 
The work of artist Michael Roque Collins is the focus of Holocaust Museum Houston's upcoming exhibition, "Sojourn in the Shadowlands." The creation of the series evolved from Collins’ recent creative territory in painting and a growing interest in a specific sort of land. He is increasingly interested in sacred landscapes, which bring to mind both the suffering which humans are capable of bestowing on one another and aspects of the meditative and possibility of hope. The series consists of more than thirty oil-on-linen and mixed media paintings on black and white photographs. Images included are from the areas of the Neuengamme, Buchenwald and Auschwitz memorial camps, reflecting the memories which the land in and surrounding these camps evoke. Through the feeding of mixed media pigment, the photographs are transformed to other worlds capable of illumination and, at times, the sacred. Museum members are invited to a free preview reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2015. To renew a membership or to join and attend, visit www.hmh.org, e-mail membership@hmh.org or call 713-527-1640.


 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours
October 10, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 

Holocaust Museum Houston will offer tours focusing on the life and ministry of the German Lutheran theologian Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer four Saturdays in October. Tours will be offered Oct. 10, 17, 24, and 31 from 10:30 a.m. to noon.  Bonhoeffer's actions against the Nazi Party and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust will be the focus of tours of the Museum's permanent exhibit, German railcar and Danish fishing boat. Tours include a look at the early influences on Bonhoeffer before the Holocaust, his organization of the Confessing Church to stand with the Jews in reaction to the Aryan clause, his involvement in assassination attempts on Adolf Hitler and his imprisonment and execution at the Flossenburg concentration camp by direct order from Hitler. The tours include the stories of the Bishop of Munster and Pastor Trocme, church leaders who strived to protect victims from Nazi tyranny. Admission and the walk-in tour are $8.  To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.


 
 
 
World Federation of Jewish Child Survivors of the Holocaust and Descendants 27th Annual Conference
October 9, 2015 9:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Location Westin Galleria Hotel, 5060 W. Alabama, Houston, TX 77056
 
Holocaust Museum Houston invites Survivors and their descendants worldwide to Houston for the 27th annual conference of the World Federation of Child Survivors of the Holocaust and Descendants, celebrating their survival and welcoming the participation of following generations. For details, visit
http://www.hmh.org/World_Federation_Conference.shtml.



 Press Release
 
 
 
Museum Educators Open House
October 3, 2015 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for the 2015 Houston Museum District Educators Open House for educational sessions with continuing education credits, interactive booths from area museums and cultural organizations and door prizes. For more information, visit www.houstonmuseumdistrict.org.


 
 
 
Opening Reception: “Roman Vishniac: A Selection from the Permanent Collection of Holocaust Museum Houston”
September 24, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Central Gallery
 
Holocaust Museum Houston is proud to present the work of famed photographer Roman Vishniac, recently donated to HMH’s permanent collection by his daughter, Mara Vishniac Kohn, with the support of the International Center of Photography (ICP). This exhibition, “Roman Vishniac: A Selection from the Permanent Collection of Holocaust Museum Houston” is presented in conjunction with the retrospective exhibition, “Roman Vishniac Rediscovered,” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.  On display at  HMH will be 11 of Vishniac’s gelatin silver prints, highlighting Jewish life in Eastern Europe, ca. 1935-1938. HMH members are invited to a free preview reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015. TO RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx. To renew a membership or to join and attend, visit www.hmh.org, e-mail membership@hmh.org or call 713-527-1640.

Photo: Boy suffering from a toothache clutches a tattered school notebook, Slonim, ca. 1935-38. Gift of Maria Vishniac Kohn. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography.

 Press Release
 
 
 
Yom Kippur
September 23, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be closed Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, in observance of Yom Kippur. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015.

 
 
 
“It's Your World - Change It!" Girl Scout Council of San Jacinto Older Girl Workshop
September 19, 2015 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Build a vision for a better world while learning how to stand up and speak out as a social innovator. Girls will complete portions of the GIRLtopia or Bliss Journeys by exploring historical leadership, prejudices and experiences with Holocaust Museum Houston. Seniors and Ambassadors will learn about persecuted populations undergoing social cruelty. In addition to Journey work, girls will learn how to be an advocate for change through the Social Innovator or Public Policy badge. This activity is girls-only. Girls may be dropped off for the program. Adults may stay at the Museum if they desire, but will not participate in activities with the girls. The cost of this program is $20, which includes a Museum tour, program supplies and lunch. For more information, call GSSJC at 713-292-0271 or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Registration ends on Sept. 6, 2015. To register, visit https://gsusa.ebiz.uapps.net/vp/FamilyManagement/ProductDetail.aspx?pid=115&ProductId=1689653915.

 
 
 
CORE Performance Company in “Life Interrupted: Honor the Innocent”
September 18, 2015 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Location Miller Outdoor Theater, 6000 Hermann Park Dr., Houston, TX 77303
 
“Life Interrupted” is a richly layered performance of contemporary dance, art and music filled with challenge and courage, sorrow and joy, confinement and liberation. The exquisite artists of CORE Performance Company, under the artistic direction of Sue Schroeder, collaborate with renowned visual artist, composer and writer, creating a universal experience from the historical - the World War II internment camp experience. Five camps operated by the Department of Justice were in Texas and were the forced home of not just Japanese, but also Italian- and German-Americans. Honor the universal found in this history through this tender, uplifting recognition of their experience. This performance is funded in part by the City of Houston through the Miller Theatre Advisory Board. Holocaust Museum Houston is a CORE Community Partner for this performance of Life Interrupted. The creation and touring of “Life Interrupted” was funded, in part, by grants from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Japanese American Confinement Sites Grant Program, Alternate ROOTS and Goethe-Zentrum Atlanta. Admission is free. Assigned seat tickets are available only on the day of the performance from the box office behind the theatre. Tickets will be distributed on a first-come basis and while supplies last between 10:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. on the day of the performance. Remaining tickets are given out one hour before curtain. Assigned, ticketed seats will be held until five minutes before the performance starts. Only four (4) tickets per person age 16 and up. For more information, visit http://www.coredance.org/cal-event/core-performance-company-in-life-interrupted. Artwork by Nancy Chikaraishi.

 
 
 
Rosh Hashanah

September 14, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be closed Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, in observance of Rosh Hashanah. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

 
 
 
Rosh Hashanah
September 14, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 AM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be closed Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, in observance of Rosh Hashanah. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.

 
 
 
"The Red Handkerchief: A Holocaust Memoir, Yvonne Ward-Hughes"
September 10, 2015 5:45 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
At age 19, Yvonne's mother, Maria Spronk-Hughes, joined a Resistance group in Amsterdam, Holland and performed acts of sabotage against the Nazis. At age 22, she was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to a Nazi prison and then to Vught Concentration Camp. In 1944, she was put on trial by the Nazis for sabotage. "The Red Handkerchief" is based on her life experience. Yvonne will talk about her mother's experiences and her moral courage to do the right thing. There will be a book signing afterward with Maria Spronk-Hughes. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. Visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.

The event will begin at 5:45 p.m. with a wine tasting hosted by Whistling Duck Vineyards & Winery (www.whistlingduckwinery.com) and Majek Vineyard & Winery (www.majekvineyard.com). Both firms will be serving several varieties of their award-winning Texas wines.  Both wineries are members of the new Texas Independence Wine Trail (www.texasindependencewinetrail.com) which boasts eight unique Texas wineries in the Houston metopolitan area's own backyard.  Most of the member wineries are located within an easy one- to two-hour drive from the Houston metropolitan area. The lecture will begin promptly at 6:30 p.m.

 
 
 
Labor Day
September 7, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be open normal business hours, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
 
 
 
"Judaism and the Arts"
August 13, 2015 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Museum of Fine Arts Houston, American General Conference Room, Beck Building, 5601 Main St. Houston, TX 77005
 

Please join us for a special program on “Judaism and the Arts.” Our speaker will be Dr. Helga Aurisch, curator of European paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Dr. Aurisch will examine the important contributions of the Jewish communities in three great cities ruled by the powerful Habsburg family: Prague, Vienna and Budapest. This empire, stretching over vast parts of Europe for nearly 600 years, was a multiethnic, multilingual and multinational configuration. At different periods the Jewish communities enjoyed religious tolerance, thrived and made noteworthy contributions to the empire’s cultural and economic prowess, while at other times they suffered persecution and reprisals. The fate of the Jews was often a direct reflection of the emperor’s political wishes or even personal attitude. The program is $18.00 general admission or $13.00 for seniors. Seating is limited. Please reserve your ticket by Aug. 3. This event is for members of The Guild. To join the Guild, please contact Courtney Tutt at ctutt@hmh.org or 713-527-1640.


 
 
 
“Hitler on Trial”
August 11, 2015 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

If you missed the first showing, join us in the second screening of “Hitler on Trial.” This 90-minute film concerns the largely forgotten story of Hans Litten, a German lawyer who took on Adolf Hitler. Litten was half-Jewish and, needless to say, when he was later arrested and sent to the camps he was forced to wear a yellow star. In the Eden Dance Palace Trial of 1931, in which four Nazi storm troopers stood accused of criminal assault and attempted murder, Litten, a lawyer for the prosecution, requested the presence of Hitler as a witness. At the trial, Hans clearly outwitted Hitler, who was frequently unable to answer his questions. The Brown Shirts were convicted, but Litten’s victory was short-lived as, two years later, Hitler became chancellor and Litten was arrested. However, Litten continued his resistance against the Nazis and fought back from the concentration camps.



 
 
 
Gerald S. Kaplan Endowment Lecture: "The Holocaust: Myths and Misconceptions"
August 5, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Historical scholarship doesn't make its way immediately into the public consciousness. In the case of the Holocaust, Northwestern University historian Peter Hayes sees a "widening and particularly stark gap" between what scholars of the Holocaust have discovered in years of serious study and what the general public thinks about the Holocaust. During the 2015 Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute and his Gerald S. Kaplan Endowment Lecture, Professor Peter Hayes, the Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor at Northwestern University and who specializes in the history of Germany in the 20th century – particularly the Nazi period – will counter common myths and misconceptions about the Holocaust. Hayes is the author or editor of 11 books, including the prize winners "Industry and Ideology: IG Farben in the Nazi Era" and "Lessons and Legacies I: The Meaning of the Holocaust in a Changing World" and "The Oxford Handbook of Holocaust Studies." Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. Photo Credit: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
 
 
 
“The Armenian Genocide: Is It Still Forgotten After 100 Years?”
August 4, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
April 2015 marked the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide. Holocaust Museum Houston will host this special lecture by Dr. Taner Akçam, the Kaloosdian/Mugar Professor at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University, on the latest research on the genocide and ethnic cleansing that took place in the early 20th century. Although the deportation and killing of Armenians was internationally condemned in 1915 as a "crime against humanity and civilization," the Ottoman government initiated a policy of denial and the Turkish Republic disputes any involvement in those crimes and the use of the word "genocide" to describe them. The case for Turkey's "official history" rests on documents from the Ottoman imperial archives, to which access has been heavily restricted until recently. By uncovering the central roles played by demographic engineering and assimilation in the Armenian genocide, the lecture will explain how this crime is understood and show that physical destruction is not the only aspect of the genocidal process. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.
 
 
 
Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute for Educators

August 4, 2015 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
The Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute for Educators at Holocaust Museum Houston is a four-day program that moves beyond the general history of the Holocaust to explore the various dimensions and implications of the Holocaust and other genocides. The institute, held each summer, provides substantive content and the opportunity to network with internationally known scholars and teachers from around the world. Working in the Museum’s exhibit space and classrooms, teachers grow in their understanding and refine their skills to teach about the history and lessons of the Holocaust and other genocides. Each year’s schedule includes one or two evening lectures. The program is directed toward educators on a secondary or higher level, but university students and educators of all levels who have a specific interest in, and background knowledge of, genocide and the Holocaust are invited to apply. Seating is limited and is on a competitive basis. The cost to attend the program is $150, which includes lunch and materials for the four days. See this year's application form for information about early registration discounts. For an application form, visit http://www.hmh.org/ed_kaplan.shtml.
 
 
 
"Holocaust 101: Teaching about the Holocaust"
August 3, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
The workshop “Holocaust 101: Teaching about the Holocaust” will help educators learn how to properly teach about the Holocaust. Created in conjunction with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, this workshop will focus on understanding both content and contexts of the Holocaust and how to incorporate them into the classroom for all students. From the inclusion of diaries and memoirs to the intersection of law and culture, participants will consider content, context and pedagogical best practices in teaching about the Holocaust. Participants will engage in a rich examination of Holocaust history and will also be actively involved in using strategies to incorporate directly into the classroom. All participants will leave with new materials to use and new ideas on teaching about the Holocaust. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies (particularly World History) and English/Language Arts teachers in grades three through 12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies should also consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials, morning snacks and lunch. Registration is limited to 30 teachers and will close July 27, 2015. Educators can attend this workshop as part of the Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute for Educators (http://www.hmh.org/ed_kaplan.shtml) or as a standalone worksho. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx.


 
 
 
“Hitler on Trial”
July 23, 2015 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
This 90-minute film concerns the largely forgotten story of Hans Litten, a German lawyer who took on Adolf Hitler. Litten was half-Jewish and, needless to say, when he was later arrested and sent to the camps he was forced to wear a yellow star. In the Eden Dance Palace Trial of 1931, in which four Nazi storm troopers stood accused of criminal assault and attempted murder, Litten, a lawyer for the prosecution, requested the presence of Hitler as a witness. At the trial, Hans clearly outwitted Hitler, who was frequently unable to answer his questions. The Brown Shirts were convicted, but Litten’s victory was short-lived as, two years later, Hitler became chancellor, and Litten was arrested. However, Litten continued his resistance against the Nazis and fought back from the concentration camps. Admission is free, but seating is limited and advance reservations are requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. Photo courtesy BBC Worldwide North America.

 
 
 
Opening Reception: "Soul Survivors"
July 9, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Central Gallery
 
 The compelling exhibition, "Soul Survivors," will be the focus of Holocaust Museum Houston’s newest show highlighting several Houston-area Survivors of the Holocaust. The exhibit is comprised of seven composite art drawings by Lois Gibson, forensic artist for the Houston Police Department and other area law enforcement agencies. Gibson worked with five Survivors to sketch images of family members, who perished in the Holocaust, strictly from the Survivor’s memory. On display in the Central Gallery, July 10, 2015 through September 13, 2015, this exhibition provides a poignant expression of those lost in the Holocaust through the technique of forensic art. Members of the Museum are invited to a free preview reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 9, 2015. To join or renew a membership to attend, email membership@hmh.org or call 713-942-8000, ext. 116.


 Press Release
 
 
 
Independence Day
July 3, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 AM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be open normal business hours, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 
 
 
“The Walk to Freedom”
June 18, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Houston Museum of African American Culture, 4807 Caroline St.
 
Join the Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC) and Holocaust Museum Houston as we come together to commemorate Juneteenth. Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration marking the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that Union soldiers led by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. The evening will begin at HMAAC with light refreshments and an historical overview of the history of Juneteenth. At 6:35 p.m., participants will take a reflective walk four blocks down Caroline Street to Holocaust Museum Houston to remember those who walked off plantations 149 years ago to begin their lives as freed individuals. A Holocaust Survivor is scheduled to address the crowd. Admission is free, but seating is limited and advance registration is requested. Visit https://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.


 
 
 
"Carl Lutz: The Forgotten Hero" (in German with English subtitles)
June 4, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
This 92-minute feature documentary by Daniel von Aarburg tells the story of Swiss diplomat Carl Lutz (1895-1975), acting head of the Swiss Embassy in Budapest during World War II. Lutz negotiated a special deal with the Hungarian government and the Nazis, gaining permission to issue protective letters to 8,000 Hungarian Jews to emigrate to Palestine. He also set up “safe houses” around Budapest, declaring them annexes of the Swiss legation and thus off-limits to Hungarian forces or Nazi soldiers. However, his achievements were not immediately recognized in Switzerland. Soon after the war, he had been criticized by the government for having exceeded his authority and for missing expense receipts. Later, Lutz was "rehabilitated" in terms of public reputation, and his achievements were honored by the Swiss government. In 1965, he was recognized by Yad Vashem as “Righteous Among the Nations.” Agnes Hirschi, his stepdaughter, retells the incredible story at the original locations in Hungary. The story is complemented by statements of contemporary witnesses from all around the world, including Houston survivor Alex Schlesinger. The film screening is sponsored by the Consulate of Switzerland. Admission is free, but reservations are requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx.

Swiss Logo



 
 
 
“Reflections on the Centenary of the Armenian Genocide”
May 27, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, Dr. Richard Hovannisian will reflect on the meaning and relevance of the genocide in personal and collective terms and assesse the advances in understanding the phenomenon of genocide in modern history. His work spans not only his professional and scholarly research, but also his personal experience of being raised by genocide survivors in California.  Hovannisian is professor emeritus of Armenian and Near Eastern History and first holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a Distinguished Chancellor’s Fellow at Chapman University and an adjunct professor of history at the University of Southern California, working with the Shoah Foundation. A native of California, he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate in history from UCLA. A member of the UCLA faculty since the 1960s, he has organized both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Armenian history and served as associate director of UCLA's Center for Near Eastern Studies from 1978 to 1995. He is a Guggenheim Fellow, as well as the founder and six-time president of the Society for Armenian Studies. Hovannisian has published 30 books and numerous scholarly articles, including five volumes on the Armenian Genocide and 13 volumes on historic Armenian cities and provinces in the Ottoman Empire. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.


 
 
 
“Reflections on the Centenary of the Armenian Genocide”
May 27, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
In conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, Dr. Richard Hovannisian will reflect on the meaning and relevance of the genocide in personal and collective terms and assess the advances in understanding the phenomenon of genocide in modern history. His work spans not only his professional and scholarly research, but also his personal experience of being raised by genocide survivors in California.  Hovannisian is professor emeritus of Armenian and Near Eastern History and first holder of the Armenian Educational Foundation Chair in Modern Armenian History at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a Distinguished Chancellor’s Fellow at Chapman University and an adjunct professor of history at the University of Southern California, working with the Shoah Foundation. A native of California, he received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate in history from UCLA. A member of the UCLA faculty since the 1960s, he has organized both the undergraduate and graduate programs in Armenian history and served as associate director of UCLA's Center for Near Eastern Studies from 1978 to 1995. He is a Guggenheim Fellow, as well as the founder and six-time president of the Society for Armenian Studies. Hovannisian has published 30 books and numerous scholarly articles, including five volumes on the Armenian Genocide and 13 volumes on historic Armenian cities and provinces in the Ottoman Empire. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.


 
 
 
Warren Fellowship for Future Teachers
May 25, 2015 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
The Warren Fellowship for Future Teachers is a week-long program that introduces university students preparing for a career in teaching to the history and to the lessons of the Holocaust and other genocides. The Warren Fellowship, supported by The Warren Fellowship Fund, is developing a corps of educators who want to learn how to effectively teach about genocide and the Holocaust. The fellowship takes place at Holocaust Museum Houston in Houston, Texas each spring. Twenty-five pre-service teacher educators and graduate students will be selected by a faculty and Museum panel and will be designated as Warren Fellows. Once accepted to this prestigious fellowship, participants attend a six–day, expense-paid institute designed to immerse the Fellows in historical and pedagogical issues related to the Holocaust. During the week, Fellows have the opportunity to meet and work with survivors of the Holocaust. Following the program, Fellows are invited to participate in numerous educational activities and outreach opportunities, including the possibility of study at Yad Vashem in Israel. Students who plan to teach elementary, middle or secondary school or at the university level are encouraged to apply for the Warren Fellowship. This prestigious program is by application only. Application deadline is April 10, 2015. To apply, visit www.hmh.org and click the Education/Outreach tab.

 
 
 
Memorial Day
May 25, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 

The Museum will be open normal business hours, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.


 
 
 
“Implementing All Behaviors Count in School Settings” 
May 15, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Join the education team for a one-day workshop to learn about utilizing Holocaust Museum Houston’s “All Behaviors Count” program in the classroom. “All Behaviors Count” is a free modular program that examines the five forms of socialcruelty: taunting, rumoring, exclusion, ganging up and bullying. This program examines the role each of the five forms of social cruelty plays in school life and in culture. Broadening the topic to include other aspects of social cruelty is significantly more effective than approaching bullying as a singular behavior. In addition to teaching about these negative behaviors, this program also focuses on teaching about how to respond to social cruelty in positive ways. These social resiliency skills – both intra-and inter-personal – mean that students who participate in the program are prepared to address issues of social cruelty directly. In this session, educators will learn how to use examples from media and popular culture the classroom to widen the experiences students see and discuss. This program is highly recommended for districts working to meet state guidelines regarding stopping bullying in all grade levels (K-12). Teachers, principals, curriculum leaders and guidance counselors should consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Social and Emotional Needs of G/T Learners. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by May 12, 2015. To register, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
"The Untold Story of Ralph Carr and the Japanese: Fate of Three Japanese Americans and the Internment"
May 14, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
This 50-minute film follows three Japanese Americans in the 1940s who were impacted by the order to forcibly relocate from their homes and how theirs lives intersected with then-Colorado Gov. Ralph Carr, a vocal defender of civil rights and opponent of internment. The documentary provides perspectives from each individual including Robert Fuchigami, whose family life was irreversibly tarnished by their internment in Amache, the government-run camp in Colorado; Herbert Inouye, whose family was warmly welcomed at the Colorado border after a harrowing journey from his home state of California; and Colorado native Mitchie Terasaki, who avoided internment after she was hired by Carr for a position in the Colorado state government. A passionate defender of Japanese American rights, Carr publicly opposed internment and believed that denying any group its constitutional rights would put the rights of all Americans in jeopardy. “If you harm them, you must harm me,” he once famously said. The governor held firmly to his belief in equality and justice for all throughout his political career. Though his beliefs would ultimately cost him election to the Senate, he firmly stood by his moral code." Light refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m., with the film beginning at 7 p.m. followed by a panel discussion. This film is cosponsored with the Consulate-General of Japan in Houston and the Japanese American Citizens League. Admission is free, but advance registration is requested. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.

 
 
 
“The Armenian Genocide: Is It Still Forgotten After 100 Years?”
May 4, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
April 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide. Holocaust Museum Houston will host this special lecture by Dr. Taner Akçam, the Kaloosdian/Mugar Professor at the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University, on the latest research on the genocide and ethnic cleansing that took place in the early 20th century. Although the deportation and killing of Armenians was internationally condemned in 1915 as a "crime against humanity and civilization," the Ottoman government initiated a policy of denial and the Turkish Republic disputes any involvement in those crimes and the use of the word "genocide" to describe them. The case for Turkey's "official history" rests on documents from the Ottoman imperial archives, to which access has been heavily restricted until recently. By uncovering the central roles played by demographic engineering and assimilation in the Armenian genocide, the lecture will explain how this crime is understood and show that physical destruction is not the only aspect of the genocidal process. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.
 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours at Holocaust Museum 
April 25, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston is commemorating the 70th. anniversary of the death of German Lutheran Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer by offering Bonhoeffer Tours from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 25, 2015. Bonhoeffer was hanged at Flossenburg Concentration Camp by direct order from Adolf Hitler on April 9, 1945. The Bonhoeffer Tours provide an opportunity for Museum visitors to learn the story of Bonhoeffer's ministry and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust as presented in the Holocaust Museum Houston exhibits. Admission is free for students and  $8 for nonmember adults, HMH members, seniors and members of the active-duty military. Tour sizes are limited, and advance reservation is requested. To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.
 
 
 
Citywide Yom HaShoah Commemoration
April 19, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location Congregation Emanu El, 1500 Sunset Blvd, Houston, TX 77005
 
Join us for Houston’s annual Yom HaShoah commemorative service in memory of all who died in the Holocaust and to pay tribute to those who survived. The service is free and open to the public.
 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours at Holocaust Museum 
April 18, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston is commemorating the 70th. anniversary of the death of German Lutheran Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer by offering Bonhoeffer Tours from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, April 18 and 25, 2015. Bonhoeffer was hanged at Flossenburg Concentration Camp by direct order from Adolf Hitler on April 9, 1945. The Bonhoeffer Tours provide an opportunity for Museum visitors to learn the story of Bonhoeffer's ministry and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust as presented in the Holocaust Museum Houston exhibits. Admission is free for students and  $8 for nonmember adults, HMH members, seniors and members of the active-duty military. Tour sizes are limited, and advance reservation is requested. To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.
 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours at Holocaust Museum 
April 11, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston is commemorating the 70th. anniversary of the death of German Lutheran Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer by offering Bonhoeffer Tours from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, April 11, 18, and 25, 2015. Bonhoeffer was hanged at Flossenburg Concentration Camp by direct order from Adolf Hitler on April 9, 1945. The Bonhoeffer Tours provide an opportunity for Museum visitors to learn the story of Bonhoeffer's ministry and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust as presented in the Holocaust Museum Houston exhibits. Admission is free for students and  $8 for nonmember adults, HMH members, seniors and members of the active-duty military. Tour sizes are limited, and advance reservation is requested. To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.

 
 
 
“Genocide in the News”
April 10, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
What is genocide? This term is used in headlines all over the world, but what does it mean? And what can you do to stop it? On Friday, April 10, 2014, as part of Genocide Awareness Month, Holocaust Museum Houston will provide a one-day workshop examining genocide today. This workshop will examine the development of the controversial definition of genocide and look at current genocides in the world. Using primary source materials and film segments, participants will be prepared to make pedagogical choices as they implement studies related to genocide. Time also will be spent considering the concept of “Responsibility to Protect” and the role of the U.S. in genocide prevention, with a focus on how to affect real change from your classroom. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies (particularly World History) and English/Language Arts teachers in grades three through 12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies also may wish to consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by April 8, 2015. To register, visit www.hmh.org

 
 
 
Easter Sunday
April 5, 2015 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be closed Sunday, April 5, 2015, in observance of Easter Sunday. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. Monday, April 6, 2015.
 
 
 
Bonhoeffer Tours at Holocaust Museum 
April 4, 2015 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston is commemorating the 70th. anniversary of the death of German Lutheran Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer by offering Bonhoeffer Tours from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, April 4, 11, 18, and 25, 2015. Bonhoeffer was hanged at Flossenburg Concentration Camp by direct order from Adolf Hitler on April 9, 1945. The Bonhoeffer Tours provide an opportunity for Museum visitors to learn the story of Bonhoeffer's ministry and his message to the church in the context of the events of the Holocaust as presented in the Holocaust Museum Houston exhibits. Admission is free for students and  $8 for nonmember adults, HMH members, seniors and members of the active-duty military. Tour sizes are limited, and advance reservation is requested. To register for any tour, call 713-527-1602 or e-mail tours@hmh.org.

 
 
 
Good Friday
April 3, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will be open normal business hours, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 
 
 
Opening Reception: "The Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust: One Man Takes a Stand"
April 1, 2015 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Armin T. Wegner, who took pictures of dead, starving and homeless men, women and children during the atrocities against Armenians by the Ottoman Empire during World War I, was not Armenian or Jewish. He was a German who served as a nurse in the German army during the war, and he did not set out to shock or offend but to offer visible proof of the first European genocide of the 20th century. In April 1915, the Ottoman government embarked upon the systematic decimation of its civilian Armenian population. The persecutions continued with varying intensity until 1923 when the Ottoman Empire ceased to exist and was replaced by the Republic of Turkey. Although Wegner risked death for exposing his country's Turkish allies, he took numerous photos and kept diaries of the persecution, deportation and murder of the Armenians, a Christian minority. Estimates vary, but scholars agree between 600,000 and more than 1.5 million Armenians perished in Anatolia as a result of execution, starvation, disease, the harsh environment and physical abuse, many from 1915-1916. Turkey continues to dispute its role and the use of the term “genocide” to describe the massacres. More than 60 photographic plates from his work are the focus of this new exhibit “The Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust: One Man Takes a Stand.” The public is invited to the opening reception on Wednesday, April 1, 2015 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. To RSVP online, visit https://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.


 
 
 
"The Rise of Antisemitism in Europe and Why America Should Care"
March 30, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
In recent months, acts of antisemitic and xenophobic violence have grabbed headlines across Europe. In France, Belgium and Germany, violence and hate speech targeting Jews marred protests on the war between Israel and Gaza. Antisemitic, anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim far-right parties scored electoral gains in a number of European countries this spring, giving them 59 seats in the European Parliament. In France, Marine Le Pen's National Front made large gains in both European and local elections. In Greece and Hungary, the openly racist and antisemitic parties Golden Dawn and Jobbik continue to amass political power while they foster discrimination and violence. Political leaders in both countries have failed to combat the rising tide of violent antisemitism and extremism, at times empowering extremist parties to gain more ground. At a time when the transatlantic alliance is more important than ever, the United States cannot afford to allow its allies, especially those in the European Union, to erode democratic norms. At a recent meeting of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power cautioned that antisemitism is a threat to the future of Europe. During this discussion, Human Rights First's Elisa Massimino and Tad Stahnke will discuss the growth of antisemitism in Europe, and how the American policymakers and European leaders should respond to these trends in order to protect the values of liberal democracy and maintain a strong Trans-Atlantic Alliance. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
“Implementing ‘All Behaviors Count’ in School Settings”
March 27, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
On Friday, March 27, join Holocaust Museum Houston’s education team for a one-day workshop to learn about utilizing the Museum’s “All Behaviors Count” program in your classroom. “All Behaviors Count” is a free modular program that examines the five forms of social cruelty: taunting, rumoring, exclusion, ganging up and bullying. This program examines the role each of the five forms of social cruelty plays in both school life and in culture. Broadening the topic to include other aspects of social cruelty is significantly more effective than approaching bullying as a singular behavior. In addition to teaching about these negative behaviors, this program also focuses on teaching about how to respond to social cruelty in positive ways. These social resiliency skills – both intra-and inter-personal – mean that students who participate in the program are prepared to address issues of social cruelty directly. In this session, educators will learn how to use examples from media and popular culture in classroom instruction to widen the experiences students see and discuss. This program is highly recommended for districts working to meet state guidelines regarding stopping bullying in all grade levels (K-12). Teachers, principals, curriculum leaders and guidance counselors should consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Social and Emotional Needs of G/T Learners. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. This event has reached its maximum seating capacity.

 
 
 
“The Last Mentsch”
March 12, 2015 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Mena’hem Teitelbaum, a survivor of Nazi concentration camps, has been running from his experience all his life by denying his Jewish heritage. He sought to forget the trauma by creating a new identity for himself, Marcus Schwarz, in Germany, one without Jewish friends or ties. Now faced with his own mortality, he suddenly wishes to be buried in a Jewish cemetery. To be buried there, a person must be Jewish and much to his dismay, his word is not enough for the rabbis; he must prove that he is, in fact, Jewish. However, with all his family gone and no remaining records, he has no evidence, save for the faded tattoo on his forearm. Marcus’s only hope is to return to the Hungarian village he grew up in to try to find proof of his birth. A young Turkish girl is deeply moved by his story and offers to drive him to Hungary – she knows exactly what it means to feel lost and uprooted. The unlikely duo set out on a road trip across Europe that will end up irrevocably changing them both. Award-winning documentarian Pierre-Henri Salfati’s 90-minute foray into feature narrative filmmaking is a thoughtfully rendered story of friendship and healing. Poignant, funny and deeply moving, "The Last Mentsch" is a powerful, emotional journey. This film is presented in conjunction with the Houston Jewish Film Festival. Tickets are $8 for HMH members, members of the Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center, the JCC Patron of the Arts, students, seniors age 60+. Tickets for the general public are $10. HMH members may purchase tickets online at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. JCC members may purchase tickets by calling 713-942-8000, ext. 400.




 
 
 
Geneaology Research Seminar 
February 28, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location Laurie and Milton Boniuk Resource Center and Library
 
Holocaust Museum Houston is pleased to announce its collaboration with Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research in bringing Houston a genealogical research seminar. Embarking on a family history research project is a great way to pass down our stories and those of our ancestors’ lives. Sue Kaufman, manager of Houston Public Library's Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research, will present basic steps for getting started on your family history journey with a special emphasis on Jewish genealogical research.  Amanda McKenzie, assistant librarian at Holocaust Museum Houston, will give an introduction to Jewish genealogical tools that will assist researching Holocaust survivors and victims. Join the Museum and the library to learn about the resources available for your search. The program is brought to the public by HMH’s Friends of the Library affinity group. Admission, which includes entry to the Museum, is $12 for nonmember adults, $8 for seniors and active-duty military, and free for HMH members and students. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. Visit https://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.



 
 
 
“Witness in Uniform”
February 26, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
“Witness in Uniform” is a unique delegation of Israel Defense Force (IDF) soldiers who visit concentration camps in Europe as part of their training. These delegations consist of IDF officers from various units, including reservists. The delegations visit the concentration and death camps, the ghettos and the old communities of the destroyed European Jewry. These trips are preceded by extensive studying and preparation that the delegation members undergo, including a tour of Yad Vashem. The soldiers also study Jewish history in general and specifically that of the Holocaust. Each delegation is accompanied by a Holocaust survivor who adds their personal story and contributes their perspective on the Holocaust.  Commanders on the trip explore issues such as how to incorporate the ethical lessons gleaned from the journey into their leadership as commanders, how to convey the history of the Holocaust to the soldiers under their command and how the Holocaust influences their identities as IDF soldiers. Holocaust Museum Houston guests will have the privilege of listening to a 25-year-old active-duty captain in the IDF navy who participated in Operation Protective Edge during the summer of 2014 explain how the visit to the concentration camps impacted their identity as an IDF soldier.  Admission is free, but seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
“Impacts of Racist Ideologies: The Holocaust and Japanese-American Internment”
February 13, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
How do the histories of the Holocaust and Japanese-American Internment intersect? During this free one-day workshop on Friday, Feb. 13, 2015, in conjunction with “The Art of Gaman” exhibition, learn how fear, enmity, prejudice and apathy worked together to harm civil societies in Nazi Germany and the United States. Working with colleagues from Houston’s Japanese Americans Citizens League, workshop participants will study how legal frameworks were implemented to remove identified “others” from society and restrict their movements to gain power – and in the case of the Holocaust, murder – over the identified people. Using current media examples and primary source materials in “The Art of Gaman,” participants will leave this program prepared to connect and teach these histories in their classrooms. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies and English/Language Arts teachers in grades three through 12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies also may wish to consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Feb. 11, 2015. Schools will be reimbursed up to $85 per teacher attending the workshop to pay for substitute teachers. To register, email your name and school to teachertraining@hmh.org or call 713-527-1605. 


 
 
 
"Carl Lutz: The Forgotten Hero"
February 12, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
This feature documentary by Daniel von Aarburg tells the story of Swiss diplomat Carl Lutz (1895-1975), acting head of the Swiss Embassy in Budapest during World War II. Lutz negotiated a special deal with the Hungarian government and the Nazis, gaining permission to issue protective letters to 8,000 Hungarian Jews to emigrate to Palestine. He also set up “safe houses” around Budapest, declaring them annexes of the Swiss legation and thus off-limits to Hungarian forces or Nazi soldiers. However, his achievements were not immediately recognized in Switzerland. Soon after the war, he had been criticized by the government for having exceeded his authority and for missing expense receipts. Later, Lutz was "rehabilitated" in terms of public reputation, and his achievements were honored by the Swiss government. In 1965, he was recognized by Yad Vashem as “Righteous Among the Nations.” Agnes Hirschi, his stepdaughter, retells the incredible story at the original locations in Hungary. The story is complemented by statements of contemporary witnesses from all around the world, including Houston survivor Alex Schlesinger. A reception beginning at 6 p.m. will precede the film, which begins at 7 p.m. The film screening is sponsored by the Consulate of Switzerland. Admission is free, but reservations are requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx.

Swiss Logo



 
 
 
“The Nanjing Atrocities: Crimes of War”
January 30, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Before Hitler invaded Poland and before the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, the Pacific Theater was host to a different human rights atrocity: the Siege of Nanjing. Lead by scholars from Facing History and Ourselves, this day-long workshop will invite educators to critically analyze and reflect on one case of mass atrocity committed in the 20th century. Participants will study the choices of individuals and groups in the midst of war by focusing on a pedagogical approach to teaching such difficult histories, histories that raise ethical and moral questions about humanity’s capacity for violence, as well as its capacity for empathy. Through the study of primary source documents, including stories of survivors and rescuers, films and a pre-publication draft of Facing History’s newest resource “The Nanjing Atrocities: Crimes of War,” participants will explore the complex answers to these questions, and more: What is the relationship between war and war crimes? How does our understanding of World War II change when we confront the history of the war between Japan and China? What can we learn about obedience, authority and historical memories when studying the Japanese invasion of Nanjing in 1937 and its aftermath? This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies and English/Language Arts teachers in grades 3 through 12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies also may wish to consider attending. This workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for six hours in Creativity and Instructional Strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Jan. 28, 2015. To register, visit www.hmh.org.

 
 
 
Opening Reception: “The Art of Gaman”
January 29, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 
In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which led to the incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans in the United States, including men, women, children, the elderly and the infirm, for the duration of World War II. The evacuation affected the entire Japanese American population on the U.S. West Coast. Allowed only what they could carry, they were given just a few days to settle their affairs and report to assembly centers. Businesses were lost, personal property was stolen or vandalized and lives were shattered. Imprisoned in remote camps surrounded by barbed wire and guarded by soldiers with machine guns, the internees sought solace in art. Their artistic creations – a celebration of the nobility of the human spirit in adversity – are the focus of this new exhibit, “The Art of Gaman,” opening Jan. 30, 2015, and on view through Sept. 20, 2015. HMH members are invited to a free preview reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. To renew a membership or to join and attend, visit www.hmh.org, e-mail membership@hmh.org or call 713-527-1640.

 Press Release
 
 
 
International Holocaust Remembrance Day
January 27, 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
A memorial service, cosponsored by the American Jewish Committee, will be held for all members of the Consular Corps to commemorate the tragic loss of 6 million Jews in the Holocaust. For more information, call 713-942-8000, ext. 104 or e-mail events@hmh.org. This year’s event honors Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish humanitarian who worked in Budapest during World War II to rescue Jews from the Holocaust. He did this by issuing protective passports and housing Jews in buildings established as Swedish territory, saving tens of thousands of lives.

 Press Release
 
 
 
“The History of Auschwitz-Birkenau and the Preservation of the Site and Museum for the Future,” with Robert Jan Van Pelt
January 22, 2015 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Jan. 27 marks the 70th anniversary of Auschwitz’s liberation by Soviet soldiers. Since 1947, the Polish government has maintained Auschwitz as a museum and memorial. It also has been proclaimed a UNESCO World Heritage site. Preserving the site has become increasingly important, but there are opposing views on this topic. The International Auschwitz Council wants to preserve the memorial as a symbol and warning against all forms of genocide. Robert Jan van Pelt, a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, and a leading expert on Auschwitz, supports the preservation of the Auschwitz main camp, but not the Birkenau site. Since it was the place where most of the killings took place, it is a crucial site of the Holocaust. However, as most of the original structures are in a state of ruin, van Pelt thinks it would be a more fitting memorial to let Birkenau disintegrate completely, just as a million people literally disappeared. Tickets are $5 for HMH members, seniors and students and $8 for nonmembers. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. This program has been generously underwritten by Annette and Dan Gordon. 
 Press Release
 
 
 
“The Red Handkerchief: A Holocaust Memoir,” with Yvonne Ward-Hughes
January 20, 2015 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location The Menil Collection, 1533 Sul Ross St., Houston, TX 77006
 
At age 19, Yvonne’s mother, Maria Spronk-Hughes joined a resistance group in Amsterdam and performed acts of sabotage against the Nazis. At age 22, she was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to a Nazi prison and then to the Vught concentration camp. In 1944, she was put on trial by the Nazis for sabotage. “The Red Handkerchief” is based on her life experience. Yvonne will speak about her mother’s experiences and her moral courage to do the right thing. “The Red Handkerchief,” which is part of the permanent exhibition at HMH will be on loan to the Menil Collection for display during their exhibit “Experiments with Truth: Gandhi and Images of Non-Violence. Admission is free, and advance registration is not required.
 Press Release
 
 
 
"Diplomacy"
January 10, 2015 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Caroline Wiess Law Building, 1001 Bissonnet, Houston, TX 77005
 
As the Allies march toward Paris in the summer of 1944, Adolf Hitler gives orders that the French capital should not fall into enemy hands, or if it does, then only "as a field of rubble." The person assigned to carry out this barbaric act is Wehrmacht commander of Greater Paris, General Dietrich von Choltitz, who already has mines planted on the Eiffel Tower, in the Louvre and Notre Dame and on the bridges over the Seine. Nothing was to be left as a reminder of the city’s former glory. However, at dawn on Aug. 25, Swedish Consul General Raoul Nordling steals into German headquarters through a secret underground tunnel and, thus, starts a tension-filled game of cat and mouse as Nordling tries to persuade Choltitz to abandon his plan. In this riveting adaptation of the stage success by Cyril Gély, the great Volker Schlöndorff has created a psychologically elaborate game of political manners between two highly contrasting characters played by two of France’s greatest stage and screen actors, André Dussollier and Niels Arestrup. While Choltitz entrenches himself behind his duty to unquestioningly obey all military orders, Nordling tries everything he can to appeal to reason and humanity and prevent the senseless destruction of the beloved "City of Light." Admission is $7 for HMH members with presentation of the HMH membership card.

 
 
 
"Diplomacy"
January 9, 2015 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Caroline Wiess Law Building, 1001 Bissonnet, Houston, TX 77005
 
As the Allies march toward Paris in the summer of 1944, Adolf Hitler gives orders that the French capital should not fall into enemy hands, or if it does, then only "as a field of rubble." The person assigned to carry out this barbaric act is Wehrmacht commander of Greater Paris, General Dietrich von Choltitz, who already has mines planted on the Eiffel Tower, in the Louvre and Notre Dame and on the bridges over the Seine. Nothing was to be left as a reminder of the city’s former glory. However, at dawn on Aug. 25, Swedish Consul General Raoul Nordling steals into German headquarters through a secret underground tunnel and, thus, starts a tension-filled game of cat and mouse as Nordling tries to persuade Choltitz to abandon his plan. In this riveting adaptation of the stage success by Cyril Gély, the great Volker Schlöndorff has created a psychologically elaborate game of political manners between two highly contrasting characters played by two of France’s greatest stage and screen actors, André Dussollier and Niels Arestrup. While Choltitz entrenches himself behind his duty to unquestioningly obey all military orders, Nordling tries everything he can to appeal to reason and humanity and prevent the senseless destruction of the beloved "City of Light." Admission is $7 for HMH members with presentation of the HMH membership card.

 
 
 
“Watchers of the Sky”
January 7, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
The award-winning film “Watchers of the Sky” interweaves stories of remarkable courage, compassion and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin, the man who created the word “genocide” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “A Problem From Hell: America and the Age of Genocide,” the film takes viewers on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action. This powerful feature documentary exposes the uncanny parallels of genocides across time and culture. Uniquely, “Watchers of the Sky” tells the stories of five remarkable people who have worked to end the international community’s political paralysis and make “never again” a reality. The film will be introduced by Dr. Mary Johnson, senior historian at Facing History and Ourselves. Tickets are $8 for nonmembers, and $5 for HMH members, students and seniors. Visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx to RSVP online.

 
 
 
“Reflections on Memory and Writing,” with Rabbi Ranon Teller and editor and author Alexandra Zapruder
January 6, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
HMH’s exhibit “Ground Zero 360: Never Forget” remains on view through Jan. 11, 2015. In this related presentation, Rabbi Ranon Teller offers ”Ritualizing 9/11,” grappling with the horror through contemporary application of traditional ritual. As victims became aware of their impending death, many people left phone messages for their loved ones. Teller will chant transcripts of these phone messages using the traditional chant from the “Book of Lamentations.” The practice created by Rabbi Irwin Kula has become an essential part of the Yom Kippur service at Congregation Brith Shalom. Alexandra Zapruder is the editor of “Salvaged Pages: Young Writers` Diaries of the Holocaust,” which won the Jewish Book Council's 2001-2002 National Jewish Book Award in the Holocaust category. Zapruder will speak about the collection of youth diaries and her current work on the book’s second edition. This stirring collection of diaries written by young people during the Holocaust reflects a vast and diverse range of experiences — some of the writers were refugees, others were hiding or passing as non-Jews, some were imprisoned in ghettos. “Salvaged Pages” offers the first comprehensive collection of such writings, with extensive excerpts from 15 diaries, 10 of which have never before been translated and published in English. The diarists ranged in age from 12 to 22; some survived the Holocaust but most perished. Taken together, their accounts of daily events and their often unexpected thoughts, ideas and feelings serve to deepen and complicate understanding of life during the Holocaust. Zapruder was the exhibition researcher and educator for the permanent and traveling versions of “Remember the Children, Daniel’s Story” at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. She is currently an independent writer and scholar. Tickets are $8 for nonmembers, and $5 for HMH members, students and seniors. Visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx to RSVP online.


 
 
 
"Diplomacy"
January 4, 2015 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Location Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Caroline Wiess Law Building, 1001 Bissonnet, Houston, TX 77005
 
As the Allies march toward Paris in the summer of 1944, Adolf Hitler gives orders that the French capital should not fall into enemy hands, or if it does, then only "as a field of rubble." The person assigned to carry out this barbaric act is Wehrmacht commander of Greater Paris, General Dietrich von Choltitz, who already has mines planted on the Eiffel Tower, in the Louvre and Notre Dame and on the bridges over the Seine. Nothing was to be left as a reminder of the city’s former glory. However, at dawn on Aug. 25, Swedish Consul General Raoul Nordling steals into German headquarters through a secret underground tunnel and, thus, starts a tension-filled game of cat and mouse as Nordling tries to persuade Choltitz to abandon his plan. In this riveting adaptation of the stage success by Cyril Gély, the great Volker Schlöndorff has created a psychologically elaborate game of political manners between two highly contrasting characters played by two of France’s greatest stage and screen actors, André Dussollier and Niels Arestrup. While Choltitz entrenches himself behind his duty to unquestioningly obey all military orders, Nordling tries everything he can to appeal to reason and humanity and prevent the senseless destruction of the beloved "City of Light." Admission is $7 for HMH members with presentation of the HMH membership card.

 
 
 
First Responder Free Admission Day
January 3, 2015 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Holocaust Museum Houston will offer Houston-area first responders with valid ID and their immediate families free admission to its newest exhibit honoring emergency workers from noon to 5 p.m. additional Saturdays this winter. On Sept. 11, 2001, New York City was shaken to its core when two jet airliners crashed into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. In the wake of the chaos, New York-based Irish photographer Nicola McClean responded in the only way she knew how: she picked up her camera and took to the streets to try and capture the confusion and panic that surrounded her. At the same time, a young police captain in New York named Paul McCormack rushed to downtown Manhattan, and worked in the rescue and recovery effort at Ground Zero. During that time, McClean took thousands of photographs near Ground Zero and the surrounding neighborhoods, working to capture the chaos engulfing the city, as well as the work of emergency workers, police officers, firefighters and others. Over the following 10 years, McClean and McCormack worked together to create “Ground Zero 360: Never Forget,” a stunning panoramic installation of photographic images, visuals and audio clips that provides a unique insight into the hearts and minds of New Yorkers in the days that followed the attacks. Their unique exhibit remains on view through Jan. 11, 2015. Houston-area first responders and their immediately families can take advantage of free admission on Jan. 3, 2015, courtesy of the M.D. Anderson Foundation.
 
 
 
New Year’s Weekend
January 1, 2015 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
The Museum will close at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014. The Museum will be closed Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in observance of New Year’s Day. The Museum will reopen at 9 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 2, 2015.

 
 
 
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Address and Directions
 
Holocaust Museum Houston
Morgan Family Center
5401 Caroline St.
Houston, TX 77004-6804
Phone: 713-942-8000



Holocaust Museum Houston is a member of the Houston Museum District Association and is located in Houston's Museum District.

Holocaust Museum Houston is an accredited member of the American Alliance of Museums.

Hours and Admission
 
The Museum is open to the public seven days a week.

Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Noon to 5 p.m.


The Boniuk Library is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Library is closed Saturdays and Sundays.

The Museum is closed for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. For other holiday hours, visit the "Events" tab on the Museum’s Web site at www.hmh.org.

ADMISSION RATES:

Members FREE
Children under age 6 FREE
Students age 6-18 FREE
College-level with valid school ID FREE
Seniors age 65+ $8
AARP members with valid ID card $8
Active-Duty Military $8
General Admission $12

Holocaust Museum Houston is free each Thursday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and on Memorial Day (May 30, 2016), D-Day (June 6, 2016), Kristallnacht (Nov. 9, 2016) and International Holocaust Remembrance Day (Jan. 27, 2016).

Tours
 
Docent-led tours can be scheduled for schools and groups of 10 or more. Tours are available in Spanish, English and French. To arrange a docent-led tour, please call Visitor Services at 713-942-8000, ext. 302 or submit the form below.

Guided tours are available for all visitors on Saturday and Sunday. Saturday tours run at 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Sunday tours are scheduled for 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

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